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Questions

Visit the Civil Resolution Tribunal (CRT) website for the most up-to-date information. CRT policies are frequently updated.

Is the CRT the same as court?

The CRT is an administrative tribunal, not a court. The CRT has jurisdiction over many motor vehicle injury disputes, and can make decisions relating to your claim.

Does the CRT have jurisdiction over my claim?

If you have been in a motor vehicle accident after April 1, 2019, and you have “minor” injuries, the CRT has exclusive jurisdiction to hear your claims.

Do I need a lawyer to represent me at the CRT?

No, but you do have a right to representation. The CRT can be navigated alone, as this is an entirely online-based tribunal, and is intended to be user-friendly. If you have questions about your claim, or would like representation, please contact us for a free consultation.

How long do I have to start my claim?

Two years from the date of the accident. It is best practice to consult with a lawyer well in advance of this date.

What is a “minor” injury?

”Minor injury” is not a medical definition, it is a legal definition. It means injuries that resolve within 12 months, and that do not affect your activities of daily living or work. Some of these injuries include concussion, pain syndromes and whiplash.

Who determines if my injuries are “minor”?

The CRT has exclusive jurisdiction to make minor injury determinations.

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